Saturday, June 30, 2007

I'm gonna have the greenest lawn in town!

No, aliens have not confiscated mybrain cells and replaced them with a suburbanite's. See, our landlord included a "you must water your lawn" clause in our rental agreement. He spent about 15 minutes going over it. (You should have been there for the section about signage--political signs are okay, business signs, no. That took at least half an hour.)

Anyway, John has turned into a super water-recycler. He decided he would empty out our baths and put the water on the lawn. That was only a couple of days ago, and already, the lawn in front of our half of the duplex is three shades darker than the anemic stuff by the neighbor's.

I don't know Steve would feel about our littl graywater processing system, but I hope he appreciates that this summer his water bill ought to be a little lower--and his lawn a little greener.

3 comments:

Kt said...

I'd love to do this at my house! The lawn, what there is of it, is looking a little brownish in spots.

How do you make sure that soaps/shampoos in the water aren't going to wreak environmental havok?

-W- said...

A small amount of soap/shampoo is okay as long as they don't contain phosphates and better yet, are not petroleum-based. But if you're worried, just pour your water out over a mulched area. The mulch will filter out any yucky stuff, and then it will filter down into your plants.

Oh! And don't let the dirty water set for longer than 24-hours, because it will ferment and no longer be plant-friendly.

Anonymous said...

"because it will ferment"

remember those faces Calvin ustuh make from C&H when he had to eat veggies... that was the face I just made. Fermented bathwater... Gag me with ruffage!

Other than that, cool idea. If your hard core worried about plant-deaht by shampoo (down with shampoo! Demenad the real poo!) id stuff a five gallon bucket with compost/mulch and poke some holes in it to make a nice organic filter, plus those phosephates and sodium-whatsa-mates most shampoos have now adays will eventualy turn into happy electrolytes for your waiting bacterium.

--Jak